Apr
12
2017

Ohio inmates MacGyver their way into Ohio prison computer network.

Somebody call Hollywood.  There’s a movie here:

The inspector general’s report found that [Ohio’s Marion Correctional Institute] inmates “took two computers that should have been disassembled, placed hard drives into the computers, installed a network card, transported the computers across the institution for approximately 1,100 feet, through the security check point without being searched or challenged by staff, accessed an elevator to the third floor and placed the two computers in the ceiling of the P3 training room.” The report added that “they also ran wire, cable, and power cords to connect the devices undetected onto the ODRC (Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction) network.”

Via Glenn Reynolds. Note that I do not approve: the inmates were using the computers to commit more crimes. I would, however, suggest that somebody look into whether the inmates who did this might be amenable to rehabilitation.  They’ve demonstrated that they have a fairly useful skill set, after all.

3 Comments

  • jeboyle says:

    I teach people how to do this, and quite frankly, I’m impressed. They should consider going for the A+ and Network + certifications. I think you’re right about the movie; the description of the prison setup as an episode of Hogan’s Heroes has some great possibilities.

    Don’t know about the prospects for rehabilitation though; they used their network access in part to research ways to make their own ID cards, drugs and explosives.

    Robin Hoods they are not.

    • acat says:

      IF they’re willing to use their abilities against specific groups rather than *just* for their own enrichment ..
      .
      (and if you can obtain and attach a short enough leash and tight enough choke-collar …)
      .
      Mew

  • acat says:

    I’m .. disappointed in (but not surprised by) the lack of a “network inventory” monitor.
    .
    It’s not like it’s a particular *challenge*, these days, to stick a device on the network that “knows” what other devices are *expected* to be there .. and can (and will) alert when new devices are found or expected devices vanish.
    .
    Too often (this is a rather good example, actually) there’s a reliance on “the patch panels are locked down”, which is cheaper but *stupid* for a secure location.
    .
    Mew

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