Aug
22
2017

Tweet of the Day, I Can’t Figure Out Virginia’s Answer, Either edition.

In fact, I pretty much agree with everything the guy said:

Although, I must confess: I used to eat steak cooked well-done.  I know: I was young, a fool, and my family did not cook many steaks.  I have been steadily ascending out of Hell in this regard for the last twenty years, to the point now where I will eat medium-rare (while still telling them medium in restaurants, because I get the feeling that many restaurants frankly guess at the level of cookery). Ach, well. We all have shadows in our past.

18 Comments

  • ChrisValentine says:

    I grew up on a beef farm. I eat my steak well done. Mainly out of spite for those damn four legged beasts. Also, I wholeheartedly agree with my state’s food hate (Massachusetts).

  • Daniel Wallace says:

    Looks like Moe isn’t going to visit Montana anytime soon

  • BigGator5 says:

    Me too, Moe. Well done when I was younger, now I am medium-rare kind of guy. I don’t think it’s that uncommon.

  • jeboyle says:

    Well done for me, Gents, no exceptions.

    Back in my misspent youth, I worked in a lab for a Plant Pathology specialist whose sideline was stomach parasites. All of his students and anyone who worked for him were treated to an 80 slide presentation of the different kinds of beasties who can wind up in your guts because you ate raw or undercooked meat, poultry or fish.

    It left a mark.

    • Moe_Lane says:

      Heh. Seven years in a Mickey Dees did the exact same thing for me when it comes to hamburgers and other ground beef.

    • Skip says:

      So I’m curious – did the one showing you the slides take the activist route and try to scare you, or did he show you the odds of getting an infestation from any particular undercooked meat consumption event?

      I can’t readily find stats on the web, but I’d be shocked if they weren’t in the same order of magnitude as getting e-coli from either undercooked ground meat, or the increased risk of e-coli from organic vegetables, or the increased risk of e-coli from using reusable grocery bags without washing them in hot water between uses, which are all in the same range.

      The risk of salmonella from undercooked eggs is somewhat higher, but still vanishingly small, to the point that someone is likely to have, say, a 10% chance of getting sick a single time over a lifetime of eating eggs over easy.

      I just can’t imagine eating shoe leather instead of a nicely cooked steak to avoid something with that long odds.

  • Aruges says:

    Illinois seems to have a similar problem as Virginia, confusing an action done to food with the food its self… “Biting String Cheese”?

    • Skip says:

      Well, to be fair, it _could_ be a mutant strain of String Cheese that bites back…

      • acat says:

        If there’s a “right way” to eat a food, Illinoisans tend to be a little .. purist .. about it.
        .
        No catsup on hot dogs, for instance .. or pizza crust should be crisp or deeeep ..
        .
        String cheese, despite being simply mozzarella in a stick-like form-factor, is to be pulled apart (forming “strings”) and then eaten ..
        .
        Mew
        .
        .
        .
        p.s. how I order my steak depends in part on how much the steak costs .. the cheaper, the more “done” I want it.

        • Aruges says:

          As a native IL ex-pat, I’ve never encountered the purity tests you speak of. Chicago Hot Dogs are an example of culinary free expression (put whatever the dang heck you want on that dog), never heard anyone put down the simple but proven Ketchup & Mustard combo. Pizza too, Chicago has its unique styles to be sure, (and deep dish is a particular treat, especially cold the next day), but I’ve never encountered snobbishness about it. Chicago is many things (many of them awful), but it’s not NYC.

          • acat says:

            Ketchup has no place on a hot dog. This is long settled fact.
            .
            The only places with soggy pizza crust in Chicago claim to be New York style .. having eaten actual New York pizza, they’re getting that wrong too.
            .
            Mew

          • Aruges says:

            acat: You and Dirty Harry are the only sources I’ve ever encountered on that. Eaten many a dog in Chicago (especially at Hot Doug’s, long live its memory), put ketchup on them all.

  • acat says:

    Having eaten in a fairly good (by not-Chicago standards) Virginia pizza place ..
    .
    Pizza needs some amount of grease, it’s the result of cooking the cheese (and, depending on the crust and sauce and handling (slather the pan in lard before adding dough?) they can be *very* greasy.
    .
    A proper Chicago pizza won’t be a lake of grease atop a field of cheese .. but Virginians may not have imported enough Chicagoans to teach ’em.
    .
    Mew

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