Feb
06
2018

Item Seed: Potato Gun.

The idea kind of got away from me.

Potato Gun – Google Docs

Potato Gun

 

A Potato Gun looks like a two-handed revolving pistol — which is basically what it is, only everything about it is absurdly large, almost cartoonishly occult-looking, and admittedly somewhat clunky.  It’s not a gunpowder weapon, however; there’s no recoil, and firing one is merely a matter of pulling the trigger with true intent to use it.  As might be guessed, the ammunition is potatoes: as the trigger is pulled, the potato is activated and the cylinder revolves, lining up a new potato for the next ‘shot.’  

A Potato Gun holds six potatoes. The Gun’s rate of fire is precisely as fast as one can pull the trigger: maximum range is about 150 feet. Potato Guns are also effectively impossible to hide from magical detection, even assuming that the glowing runes to be found all over them would not be an instant giveaway.  The Gun is fairly robust, with few moving parts, but can only be repaired by a mage or an engineer who specializes in magical artifacts.

 

The Potato Gun does not actually fire potatoes; it just sucks them ‘dry’ (consuming them utterly in the process).  More specifically, it consumes a potato’s life force and then shoots that life force at the target.  This has no real effect on inanimate objects, very little on animate ones (a mortal that gets hit with a blast from a Potato Gun will end up feeling like he’s just had a twenty minute nap), and is utterly devastating to Undead, demons, and general negative energy creatures. One shot can pulp a zombie or new-made vampire; a full spread can wipe out a lich.

Worlds that regularly enchant Potato Guns tend not to have much of an Undead problem.  They also can make quite a bit of money from selling their surplus Guns to worlds that still do have an Undead problem.  Assuming that the Undead in the latter worlds don’t intercept the Potato Guns first, of course.  Honestly, the adventures write themselves.

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