Jan
17
2018
0

Looks like school’s open tomorrow!

I’ve had at least one of them home all day for a week. Between the trip, the vomiting, the holiday, the enforced day off, and the let’s-close-the-school-because-of-the-roads it’s been, ah, somewhat fraught.  But tomorrow they go back. For the whole day.  I could maybe write some more things.  I’ve got an idea for one that might fly with the revived Amazing Stories magazine. I just need some quiet time to work on it.

Ah, the wonders of vacations. At least, when you have kids.  And they’re good kids, too!

Jan
17
2018
0

The Way It Went Down (Delta Green Kickstarter reward) now available.

One of the rewards for the Delta Green Kickstarter was The Way It Went Down, which is a collection of 33 short-short stories by Dennis Detwiller written in the Delta Green Cthulhu Mythos universe. Three bucks, candy if you’re a Delta Green enthusiast like myself.  I personally got distracted by the book and have been steadily chewing away at it for the last hour or so; your own mileage may vary, but if you were in on the Delta Green Kickstarter I think that you’d be getting it for free anyway.

So check it out.

Jan
17
2018
0

Book of the Week: The Square Deal (Car Warriors #1).

A buddy on Twitter reminded me of David Drake’s The Square Deal (Car Warriors #1), which is indeed set in the Car Wars universe — and I don’t know why I’m on a Car Wars kick this week, either. I just… am?  It happens, sometimes. Anyway, I’ve never actually read it but the reviews are pretty solid and, well, David Drake, right? Given that it’s six bucks, just how much worse off am I for grabbing it?

And so, adieu to whatever I picked while I was on vacation.  I gotta get a proper laptop for traveling. Or even an updated Chromebook.

Jan
15
2018
5

Tweet of the Day, HPL/Billy Joel Does Work Rather Well edition.

This is an excellent catch:

Although the final line in each even-numbered stanza needs to be discarded.  Also, it needs a chorus.  Ahem: (more…)

Written by in: Books | Tags: ,
Jan
13
2018
1

Book of the Week: Fahrenheit 451.

Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451 is not necessarily the Absolutely Important Work that it’s been portrayed — as I’ve noted earlier, I have a higher opinion of people than Bradbury did — but it does have some interesting things to say about censorship.  Particularly to people who don’t realize that they’re being censorious.  Plus, you can get all his books on Kindle now.

Will get around to updating the sidebar tomorrow. Chromebook, bedtime, and beer all conspire against me. So it goes — no, wait, that’s Vonnegut.

Jan
10
2018
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Mysterion is open for submissions.

Mysterion is looking for “original Christian-themed speculative fiction stories of up to 8,000 words” (their submissions guidelines says that they’ll take reprints, though).  If you’ve got one of those, I sincerely suggest that you submit it before the January 31st deadline.  90% of success is just showing up, and all that.

Moe Lane

PS: As it happens, I had a story about Catholic priest monster strike teams, so yeah, I submitted something.

Written by in: Books | Tags:
Jan
09
2018
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In the Mail: Dark State.

Come, I will conceal nothing from you: part of the amusement value in reading Charlie Stross is in seeing him struggle manfully to get out of the hole that his typically overconfident (and typically off-kilter) predictions of the future has gotten him into.  Stross is an excellent writer, so he can typically can give it the old college try, and I can’t wait for the next Laundry novel, given that it was written in response to a particularly horrifying (for him) double-whammy by objective reality. As I think that I’ve noted in the past, reading Stross these days is like reading Lovecraft’s The Horror at Red Hook; I understand that he’s legitimately terrified, but it’s at things that simply don’t scare me in the same way, or sometimes at all. (more…)

Jan
06
2018
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Book of the Week: “With The Lightnings.”

Truth be told, With The Lightnings — David Drake’s first entry in the Leary-Mundy space opera series — is available for free.  But it’s still a fun series, not least because Drake has no intention of producing a happy-shiny spacefaring culture that has learned to get beyond those things that divide us and all the other anodyne proclamations. Nope! Leary and Mundy work for a star nation that can be rather obnoxious at times, amazingly culturally chauvinistic, and often cheerfully indifferent to corruption and the two don’t try to do anything about that. And why should they care about the way this might come across to their distant ancestors (i.e., us)? We’re practically barbarians ourselves!  I don’t know if I’d want to read nothing else besides this series, but it usually serves as a decent bracer.

And so, adieu to Silverlock.

Jan
06
2018
--

In The E-Mail: David Drake’s ‘Though Hell Should Bar The Way.’

Though Hell Should Bar The Way is David Drake’s latest entry in the Leary/Mundy series; it’s also an EARC, because as usual Baen is wise to assume that I’m willing to pay hardcover prices to read certain books a few months early. For those unfamiliar with the setting: space navy combat in a far-future where the heroes are much nicer than the star nation that they work for, which is likewise much nicer than the other star nations out there, and David Drake is unsentimental generally when it comes to politics and statecraft.  It’s all very pre-Reform Act England mixed with the Roman Republic, and quite entertaining. Hence my buying it in EARC form.

Dec
30
2017
1

Book of the Week: Silverlock.

I’m surprised that John Myers Myers’ Silverlock hasn’t been done before. Maybe I assumed that all of you already have it. If you don’t, well… be warned. You will be seduced into reacquainting yourself with Western literature. And it’ll be very sneaky about it, too.

And so, adieu to Lammas Night.

Dec
30
2017
3

Annnnnd the Internet’s back.

Alarmingly, quite a bit of my entertainment choices rely on my being able to be online.  To say nothing of you know, actually putting stuff on this website. Then again, I’m sick, right?

…And I’ve just started reading yet another Jack Campbell series: Stark’s War. I swear to God, they should declare his books to be controlled substances, or something.  No, wait, then I’d have difficulty reading them. Never mind.

Written by in: Books | Tags:
Dec
27
2017
3

Read of the Day: ‘A HISTORY OF THE SILMARILS IN THE FIFTH AGE.’

I was originally going to render that title down from all-caps, but if you’re a Tolkien geek then you’re absolutely going to agree with me that this concept deserves it. I need a word for “one step up from brilliant,” because this qualifies. This absolutely qualifies.

The Silmarillion describes the fate of the three Silmarils. Earendil kept one, and traveled with it through the sky, where it became the planet Venus. Maedhros stole another, but regretted his deed and jumped into a fiery chasm. And Maglor took the last one, but threw it into the sea in despair.

Well, Venus is still around. But what happened to the latter two? Surely over all the intervening millennia, with so many people wanting a Silmaril, they haven’t just hung around in the earth and ocean?

There’s a lot of spoilers in that link, so be careful.

Via @TimHarford.

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