Feb
18
2017
2

Book of the Week: The Warlock in Spite of Himself.

Christopher Stasheff’s The Warlock in Spite of Himself is an old classic of the pre-New Wave science fiction/fantasy* era, of course. In other news: Chris Stasheff is still, in fact, alive! Seriously, I thought that he must have passed a decade ago, or something. Here’s his website.

And so, adieu to Hidden Figures.

Moe Lane

*Psionics are fantasy, sorry.

Feb
11
2017
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Book of the Week: Hidden Figures.

My wife finally got around to reading Margot Lee Shetterly’s Hidden Figures – Christmas present, and one of the easier gift choices I’ve had to make, honestly – so now I’m reading it.  I’m enjoying it, thus far; it’s going to be interesting to see where the movie version combined, changed, and generally played around with events. Which has to happen: a movie has a different narrative flow than a book.

And so, adieu to The Voyage of the Dawn Treader.

Feb
04
2017
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Book of the Week: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader.

Well, really the entire Narnia chronicles – but I think that C.S. Lewis’s The Voyage of the Dawn Treader is the best of a good series, and at some point I need to watch the movie.  Of course, I don’t need to tell any of you this already, do I?  The Narnia series retains its significance, even today:

Well, for given values of ‘today.’

And so, adieu to Wylding Hall. (more…)

Jan
27
2017
1

Book of the Week: Wylding Hall.

I picked Wylding Hall because Ken Hite over at Facebook managed to suggest that people who don’t read Elizabeth Hand are, in the long run, not fully succeeding in life. …So far, it been a lot of fun. Sixties rock and roll meets folklore; and it’s proper folklore, too. Which is to say: dangerous, unpredictable, and bleakly indifferent to your feelings.  Worth the $2.83, easy.

And so, adieu to Northanger Abbey.

 

Jan
17
2017
2

Book of the Week: Northanger Abbey.

I am starting to feel that the single most egregious thing that was done to me in college was to omit explaining just how entertaining Jane Austen was as a writer. I mean, sheesh, it turns out that Northanger Abbey is a meta-fiction parody that snarks out on the excesses of the genre fiction of the day… and written by somebody who was good at said genre, too.  I would have happily read that.  Shoot: if Jane Austen was around today I’d probably be signed up for her Patreon and her Twitter feed. She’d certainly be writing books in the genres that I read.

And so, adieu to Red Storm Rising. Heh.  A Jane Austen technothriller.  The mind reels…

Jan
14
2017
3

Book of the Week: Red Storm Rising.

OK, look.

I picked Red Storm Rising because I was trying to remember a passage from it the other day, looked it up, and ended up reading half the book at one sitting. When Tom Clancy was on, he was on – and this was classic ‘conventional WWIII against the Soviet Union’ stuff. But: it is not a goram ‘Jack Ryan novel.’

Sheesh.

And so, adieu to Fugue State.

Jan
07
2017
--

Book of the Week: Fugue State.

Fugue State is a John M. Ford novel that I’ve never heard of before!  …It’s probably a novella, at that.  Which means: Fugue State is a John M. Ford novella that I’ve never heard of, before.  Really, the only real difference here will be how long it’ll take me to read it.

And so, adieu to The Maker of Men and His Formula, which was frankly a little too disappointingly weird for my tastes.

Dec
30
2016
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Book of the Week: The Maker of Men and His Formula.

This one is a bit of a self-indulgence: this edition of The Maker of Men and His Formula (by Jules Foche) comes across as exactly the sort of conceit where a modern writer (in this case, Brian Stableford) pretends that the book he’s written is actually a ‘translation’ or ‘adaptation’ of an obscure book from the last century.  It’s a harmless conceit, in my opinion, but in this case apparently Jules Foche was a real author of 19th Century French science fiction.  Which makes the whole thing rather meta.

And so, adieu to The Collapse: The Accidental Opening of the Berlin Wall.

Dec
24
2016
--

Book of the Week: The Palace Job.

Doing this from my Chomebook, so short and sweet: Patrick Weekes’ The Palace Job is so far a pretty sweet High Fantasy heist caper. It’s also dirt cheap on the Kindle, so check it out.  I’m pretty tired, but I’ll likely stay up late enough to finish it.  So, there’s that.

Merry Christmas!

Dec
17
2016
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Book of the Week: ‘The Collapse: The Accidental Opening of the Berlin Wall.’

I picked up The Collapse: The Accidental Opening of the Berlin Wall a while back, but didn’t get to it really until recently. It’s fascinating reading. It’s also oddly difficult to find right now, which doesn’t make much sense; they only released it two years ago.  Anyway: good book that strives to give you an idea about how the East German regime managed to drop itself on a stone floor and shatter into a million tiny pieces in what seemed like months.  Check it out.

And so, adieu to Angels of Music.

Dec
10
2016
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Book of the Week: ‘Angels of Music.’

Finally got to start Kim Newman’s Angels of Music, and it is the usual cheerful invitation to go out and actually read all of these marvelous characters in their original books. As always, lots of fun. For that esoteric value of ‘fun’ that only English majors truly know.

And so, adieu to The Demolished Man

Dec
03
2016
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Book of the Week: “The Demolished Man.”

I’ll be honest: this is largely meant as a reminder that I should go read Alfred Bester’s The Demolished Man again.  Geez, do I still even have my copy?  It was in a paperback anthology and I seem to remember that the binding was cruddy.  Anyway: great book that tried to think pretty hard about the implications of ubiquitous telepathy when it came to crime. Yeah, definitely worth a re-read.

And so, adieu to Farmer Giles of Ham.

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