Aug
19
2017
2

Book of the Week: The Starry Wisdom Library.

I bought this one back in April; but it’s been a slow week, so I’m catching up on stuff. The Starry Wisdom Library: The Catalogue of the Greatest Occult Book Auction of All Time is indispensable for anybody doing Cthulhu Mythos gaming or writing. So indispensable, in fact, that I’m just going to use it as the definitive source for Mythos tomes from now on; there is no point in trying to improve on its entries, given how well it was put together originally.

And so, adieu to the Lost Fleet.  Which was excellent, all the way through.

Aug
12
2017
5

Book of the Week: …Still Dauntless, but expanded to all three Lost Fleet series.

Look, I went to the library today and cleaned out their Jack Campbell collection, OK? Let’s just face it, this is what I’m reading for the next week. I might as well embrace it.

So just grab them, already.

Aug
03
2017
4

Book of the Week: The Lost Fleet: Dauntless.

I grabbed Jack Campbell’s The Lost Fleet: Dauntless from the local library today. …My, but it’s rather good, isn’t it? Whoever it was here who first suggested it deserves pie.

And so, adieu to Agent Garbo.

Jul
29
2017
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Book of the Week: …it’s a tough one.

I’m going to go with Agent Garbo: The Brilliant, Eccentric Secret Agent Who Tricked Hitler and Saved D-Day. Because it’s insane that this scheme actually worked. Even if you believe that Admiral Canaris was in on the whole thing, which isn’t really supported by the text of that book.

And so, adieu to The Delirium Brief.

Jul
21
2017
8

Book of the Week: The Delirium Brief.

The Delirium Brief by Charles Stross is the latest in his Lovecraft-meets-espionage Laundry series, and it’s… well.  How do I put this nicely?  Charlie Stross — who is from Great Britain — has clearly been scared spitless by three specific current events since 2014 (two domestic and one foreign from his point of view, and you can almost certainly guess what those events were), and his horrified reaction to at least two of them clearly comes across in the book.  The effect is much like reading “The Horror At Red Hook” when you’re not a racist; you don’t get the same effect as you would from reading about stuff that actually scares you, but the horror that you pick up from the author still gives a certain frisson.

There. That should be polite enough.  After all, I do buy Charles Stross in hardcover. (more…)

Jul
15
2017
--

Book of the Week: A Wrinkle in Time.

Madeleine L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time is, of course, a classic; but it’s also a children’s book — and one the first science fiction stories that I got to read.  Which makes it a favorite of mine.  :narrowed eyes: Not to mention a subject of some concern, given that Disney is making a movie of it.

…And it had better be a good movie, too.  Some things may not be borne.

And so, adieu to 1636: The Kremlin Games.

Moe Lane

Jul
08
2017
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Book of the Week: 1636: The Kremlin Games.

Been reading the 163x Grantville alternate history series again, mostly because I wanted to. 1636: The Kremlin Games (authors Eric Flint, Gorg Huff, and Paula Goodlett) is a reasonably standalone novel in that series, and pretty engrossing.  Russia’s always an interesting locale to put a speculative fiction story, not least because the place seems half-fantastic to Western readers anyway.

And so, adieu to The Day of the Triffids.

Jun
30
2017
3

Book of the Week: The Day of the Triffids.

John Wyndham’s The Day of the Triffids is of interest to me not just because of the book, but because for some reason I thought that I was thinking of the 1962 movie version of it when I was actually thinking of the 1981 BBC miniseries. Which makes more sense, because I was wondering how 1962 could have possibly managed to make a movie that was actually faithful to the book. Short answer: it didn’t, of course.  Anyway, good book, well worth revisiting’ but just remember that it was written in the 1950s.

And so, adieu to A Civil Campaign. (more…)

Jun
24
2017
4

Book of the Week: A Civil Campaign.

I’m kind of unsure whether I should make Lois McMaster Bujold’s A Civil Campaign the Book of the Week.  I mean, yes, it’s bloody brilliant. The Vorkosigan series generally is, and Bujold has a remarkable capacity for precipitating out genuine hilarity from the most unpromising of sources. I just don’t know whether or not it’s the best gateway to the entire Vorkosigan series.  Of course, most people here don’t really need to be told to buy this book, do they?  You already know. You probably already have.

Ach, well, maybe somebody will see this post someday in a Google search.

And thus, we say adieu to The Hunt For Red October. (more…)

Jun
17
2017
6

Book of the Week: The Hunt For Red October.

I got turned on to Tom Clancy novels by a buddy in college. The Hunt For Red October was maybe the first one I read, because of the movie (which is, of course, excellent, and not least because it boasts a remarkably good cast). It was about then, I think, that I started coming to the (at the time) uncomfortable realization that maybe Ronald Reagan wasn’t an amiable dunce after all.  …Much followed, from that.

And so, adieu to Hard Magic. (more…)

Jun
03
2017
1

Book of the Week: The Alamo.

This is my week for getting back to books that I inexplicably put down and didn’t pick up again.  In this case: John Myers Myers’ The Alamo (I don’t need to explain to you what the book is about, right?).  I wonder how Mr. Myers felt about the fact that — despite the fact that he was primarily a writer of history, with a focus on the American West — he’s remembered today primarily for Silverlock.  Then again, it’s not like he didn’t write Silverlock, now is it?

And so, adieu to Sweet Silver Blues.

May
27
2017
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Book of the Week: Sweet Silver Blues.

Sweet Silver Blues is Glen Cook’s first book in his Garrett, PI series. It’s basically hard-boiled detective fiction set in a fantasy medieval city, only not in a gimmicky way because it takes seriously the detective portion of it and the doesn’t use the fantasy portion of it to cheat on the plot.  The series also has the nice quality of allowing the setting to keep evolving; the world is significantly different at the end of the latest book than it was at the beginning of the first. Check it out.

And so, adieu to The Berlin Project.

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