Mar
25
2017
1

Book of the Week: The Stand.

Although, I have to admit: Stephen King’s The Stand has a lot to answer for.  More accurately, the expanded version does. The problem was not so much in the fact that King’s book about medieval Christianity (I’ve seen him cop to that, in those words) set in a post-apocalyptic America was reissued with all the previously-cut bits put back in.  It’s that the book sold like even more hotcakes afterward, convincing the world that expanded versions of previous best-sellers were just what American literature needed.  Alas, this was not true.

Still, the book itself is fantastic. In both versions.  And, I suppose, in both meanings of the word.

And so, adieu to Lords and Ladies.

Mar
16
2017
--

Book of the Week: Lords and Ladies.

I assume that most of you have read Terry Pratchett’s Lords and Ladies by now, but on the off chance that you haven’t: Terry Pratchett understood folklore. And he knew what lay behind the Victorian flower fairies and Tolkien’s mighty, yet noble Elves. Oh, my, yes, he knew.

So read it, if you haven’t.

And so, adieu to Bugs in the System.

Mar
07
2017
--

Book of the Week: Bugs in the System.

A gaming buddy of mine has a story in Bugs in the System, which is gaming fiction related to the We Hunt Bugs RPG. That’s worth a Book of the Week nod, in my humble opinion. Every little bit helps, right?  And we’re all in this together.

And so, adieu to Firestar.

 

Feb
27
2017
3

Book of the Week: Firestar.

Firestar by Michael Flynn was written in 1996, and I’m increasingly reminded of it every time I read something on private space projects. I suspect that my readers who are unfamiliar with the book (basically, space opera of the near-future) will find it of no little interest: in particular, the way that ‘corporate’ is not used as a dirty word. I am mildly startled that it’s not available for the Kindle, but sometimes there are logistical issues involved.

And so, adieu to Bookburners. Wow, that one went fast.

Feb
25
2017
1

Book of the Week: Bookburners.

Bookburners is this ensemble novel written by Max Gladstone, Margaret Dunlap, Mur Lafferty, and Brian Francis Slattery, or perhaps ‘episodic’ is more the right word.  It reads a lot like a season-long television series would (the subtitle is even ‘Season One’), which is not actually a bad thing in this context. You see, the Bookburners in question work for a secret anti-magic Vatican task force that captures evil books before the books in question eat any more people*; which, you have to admit, is not a bad concept for a TV show.  You get the feeling that the authors would very much like to get optioned for this one, and I freely admit: I’d watch it.

And so, adieu to The Warlock In Spite of Himself. (more…)

Feb
18
2017
2

Book of the Week: The Warlock in Spite of Himself.

Christopher Stasheff’s The Warlock in Spite of Himself is an old classic of the pre-New Wave science fiction/fantasy* era, of course. In other news: Chris Stasheff is still, in fact, alive! Seriously, I thought that he must have passed a decade ago, or something. Here’s his website.

And so, adieu to Hidden Figures.

Moe Lane

*Psionics are fantasy, sorry.

Feb
11
2017
--

Book of the Week: Hidden Figures.

My wife finally got around to reading Margot Lee Shetterly’s Hidden Figures – Christmas present, and one of the easier gift choices I’ve had to make, honestly – so now I’m reading it.  I’m enjoying it, thus far; it’s going to be interesting to see where the movie version combined, changed, and generally played around with events. Which has to happen: a movie has a different narrative flow than a book.

And so, adieu to The Voyage of the Dawn Treader.

Feb
04
2017
--

Book of the Week: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader.

Well, really the entire Narnia chronicles – but I think that C.S. Lewis’s The Voyage of the Dawn Treader is the best of a good series, and at some point I need to watch the movie.  Of course, I don’t need to tell any of you this already, do I?  The Narnia series retains its significance, even today:

Well, for given values of ‘today.’

And so, adieu to Wylding Hall. (more…)

Jan
27
2017
1

Book of the Week: Wylding Hall.

I picked Wylding Hall because Ken Hite over at Facebook managed to suggest that people who don’t read Elizabeth Hand are, in the long run, not fully succeeding in life. …So far, it been a lot of fun. Sixties rock and roll meets folklore; and it’s proper folklore, too. Which is to say: dangerous, unpredictable, and bleakly indifferent to your feelings.  Worth the $2.83, easy.

And so, adieu to Northanger Abbey.

 

Jan
17
2017
2

Book of the Week: Northanger Abbey.

I am starting to feel that the single most egregious thing that was done to me in college was to omit explaining just how entertaining Jane Austen was as a writer. I mean, sheesh, it turns out that Northanger Abbey is a meta-fiction parody that snarks out on the excesses of the genre fiction of the day… and written by somebody who was good at said genre, too.  I would have happily read that.  Shoot: if Jane Austen was around today I’d probably be signed up for her Patreon and her Twitter feed. She’d certainly be writing books in the genres that I read.

And so, adieu to Red Storm Rising. Heh.  A Jane Austen technothriller.  The mind reels…

Jan
14
2017
3

Book of the Week: Red Storm Rising.

OK, look.

I picked Red Storm Rising because I was trying to remember a passage from it the other day, looked it up, and ended up reading half the book at one sitting. When Tom Clancy was on, he was on – and this was classic ‘conventional WWIII against the Soviet Union’ stuff. But: it is not a goram ‘Jack Ryan novel.’

Sheesh.

And so, adieu to Fugue State.

Jan
07
2017
--

Book of the Week: Fugue State.

Fugue State is a John M. Ford novel that I’ve never heard of before!  …It’s probably a novella, at that.  Which means: Fugue State is a John M. Ford novella that I’ve never heard of, before.  Really, the only real difference here will be how long it’ll take me to read it.

And so, adieu to The Maker of Men and His Formula, which was frankly a little too disappointingly weird for my tastes.

Site by Neil Stevens | Theme by TheBuckmaker.com