Jan
22
2016
5

Book of the Week: The Invisible Library (cc @GenevieveCogman).

Blipping well TOOK the Post Office long enough to get me Genevieve Cogman’s first novel The Invisible Library; mind you, I had to special-order the sucker from England. You would think that, in these halcyon days of digital inter-connectivity, we could dispense with the ridiculous notion that the British and American editions of a book cannot be published simultaneously. You would be wrong. (more…)

Jan
13
2016
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Book of the Week: “Winter of the World.”

Poul Anderson’s classic science fiction novel The Winter of the World is melancholy, of course. Books written by Poul Anderson tended to be; and books about the civilizations that arose thousands of years after a new Ice Age crushed ours also tend to be.  Combine the two, and you get almost crystallized sadness. But it’s a good story for all that; action, statecraft, Thieves’ Guild, a battle or two, and evolutionary biology.

As I said: classic science fiction.

And so, adieu to Hawksbill Station.

Jan
04
2016
2

Book of the Week: Hawksbill Station.

I’m not sure why I picked Robert Silverberg’s Hawksbill Station, actually. It’s a quirky time travel novel expanded from a short story about a political prison set up in the Precambrian Era – the ultimate in no-escape scenarios, really – and how the people in it react when someone new shows up.  It’s not the greatest time travel novel ever written, but it’s worth your attention, not least because Silverberg did not romanticize the protagonists. You can get pretty quirky yourself when you’ve been sentenced to that kind of exile.

And so, adieu to the Peter Grant series.

Dec
28
2015
1

Books of the Week: Ben Aaronovitch’s Peter Grant series.

Seriously: I’ve been binging this series this week. It’s police procedural meets hidden magic, and even though it’s very English it should be easily accessible to anybody with the good sense to read Terry Pratchett religiously. Which all of you should be doing anyway. Start with Midnight Riot (which I made BotW a while back, all on its own) and just keep going.

And so, adieu to Every Inch a King.

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Dec
22
2015
4

Book of the Week: Every Inch A King.

Every Inch a King is not Harry Turtledove’s weightiest work; but it’s entertaining.  It’s only technically fantasy: basically, real life created a story so absurd that Turtledove had to add fantastic elements to it. Nobody would have believed that it happened, otherwise.

There’s a lesson, there.

And so, adieu to Binscombe Tales – The Complete Series.
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Dec
16
2015
2

Book of the Week: Binscombe Tales – The Complete Series.

Somebody suggested these to me? I think? It’s been a long week.  Anyway: Binscombe Tales – The Complete Series has been rather good, so far. It’s a collection of short stories, which is nice, considering that I’ve had to read in bursts lately.  Which is, honestly, my own darn fault.

And so adieu to The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl Vol. 2: Squirrel You Know It’s True.  Already looking forward to Volume 3…

Dec
08
2015
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Book of the Week: …The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl Vol. 2.

Picking The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl Vol. 2: Squirrel You Know It’s True was kind of inevitable.  …’Cat Thor.’  That and the Frank Miller reference was where I lost it.

I REGRET NOTHING

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Dec
05
2015
27

I cannot think of a Book of the Week this week.

It’s like a mental block.  So let me outsource this: what should we all be reading? Feel free to sing out on this one.

Nov
16
2015
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Book of the Week: “A Field Guide to Awkward Silences.”

A Field Guide to Awkward Silences was written by Washington Post writer Alexandra Petri: I got it for my wife as a present. My wife read it, and then promptly told me that I should read it, too.  I’m about a third of the way through – Fallout Flu – but it’s pretty freaking hysterical so far.  Not my usual style at all, but still worth a look. (more…)

Nov
11
2015
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Book of the Week: King of the Wood.

John Maddox Roberts’ King of the Wood is one of those books that I’m always surprised to remember isn’t actually from the 1950s (it was published in 1983), because it has that kind of feel to it. Essentially, it’s alternate history, “Vikings in North America” subgenre: it’s got a strong fantasy component, a good bit of adventuring and derring-do, and a remarkably bloody-minded attitude towards certain aspects of pre-Christian European paganism. It’s also a book with an odd mood and an excellent eye for historical detail, and will reward the discerning reader. Check it out.

And so, adieu to Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen (Vorkosigan Saga).

Nov
02
2015
8
Oct
26
2015
2

Book of the Week: “Heavy Lifting.”

Truthfully, Heavy Lifting: Grow Up, Get a Job, Raise a Family, and Other Manly Advice (by Jim Geraghty and Cam Edwards) is also an In The Mail book, seeing as I got it this afternoon, but I cracked the book open at random and found it a good read, so it’s probably safe to sign off on this one. I’ll probably end up interviewing Jim about the book, at some point in the near future. So keep watching the skies…

And so, adieu to 1635: A Parcel of Rogues (The Ring of Fire)… which I still haven’t gotten around to getting, somehow. Why is that? …Oh, right, the Delta Green Kickstarter. (more…)

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