Aug
23
2016
0

Book of the Week: Angels of Music.

Angels of Music is Kim Newman’s next book; it’s out October 4th. It’s also ABOUT DAMNED TIME that Kim Newman wrote a new book; I was starting to get worried about that. It all looks very historical and horrific and stylish and fun, just like Newman’s other novels: I don’t know if it has vampires in it. Although it does have Kate Reed, so maybe.

And so, adieu to The Thin Man.

Aug
13
2016
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Book of the Week: Newton’s Cannon.

Newton’s Cannon is the first book in Gregory Keyes’ Age of Unreason series, and it flows from an interesting idea: what if, when Isaac Newton went looking for alchemy, there was something there to be found?  …The answer to that question took several books, and by the end of the series most of the survivors kind of wished that Newton had stuck to optics. But I will say no more on that subject.

And so, adieu to The Thin Man.

Aug
06
2016
1

Book of the Week: The Thin Man.

I’m a little surprised that I haven’t read this particular Dashiell Hammett book before, either. I mean, it’s not like I don’t read hard-boiled detective stories normally.  Although I haven’t read any in a while. So maybe that’s why I haven’t read The Thin Man before? :shrug:

At any rate, adieu to Great Pacific War.

Jul
28
2016
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Book of the Week: Great Pacific War.

This one is interesting: Great Pacific War was written in 1925, and it imagined what a naval war between the United States and Japan would have looked like if it happened in 1931. It’s highly plausible – many of the Japanese moves in that war were reflected in our World War II, which may not have been accidental (it was an influential book, apparently) – but I’m struck more by the differences.  The Imperial Japanese are remarkably more respectful of the laws of war in this book, for one thing. Although that may be balanced out by the casual assumption that of course poison gas would be used in battle this time, too.  Still, definitely worth a read, especially at that price.

And so, adieu to Our Lady of Darkness.

Moe Lane

Jul
15
2016
2

Book of the Week: Earthrise.

Never underestimate the power of social media. I came across author M.C.A. Hogarth on Twitter because she kept saying interesting things that other people retweeted; and her space opera book Earthrise was available for free on Kindle.  So I figured, why not?

…And here we are.

And so, adieu to Herb-Witch.  I’m already at book three in THAT series.

Jul
04
2016
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Book of the Week: ‘Herb-Witch.’

Herb-Witch was written by Beth McCoy, who is an old friend of mine from the In Nomine List days. And now she writes books! This is the first one of hers that I’ve picked up, and it’s rather good. A well thought-out system of alchemy and herbalism as sciences (and not in the sense that one is chemistry and the other is botany, either), and the likely implications thereof. So far, so good.

And so, adieu to The Nightmare Stacks.

Jun
28
2016
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Book of the Week: The Nightmare Stacks

I just finished it, and I’m comfortable with naming The Nightmare Stacks my Book of the Week. It’s about elves, and vampires, and (for a British Lefty, at least) a surprising amount of military porn. I mean, it was weird. I’d have totally expected it from an American author, but from Charlie Stross? Guess that’ll teach me to assume.

And so, adieu to The Thousand Names. I read the next two books in the series, by the way. They were good! (more…)

Jun
20
2016
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Book of the Week: The Thousand Names.

I had somebody on Twitter recommend The Thousand Names: Book One of the Shadow Campaigns, and I’m about a third of the way through. It’s quite good: military fantasy, Brown Bess-level technology and social structure, crackerjack action.  Also, two bucks on Amazon!  Seriously, I don’t know why half of you aren’t reading this book already.

And so, adieu to Medusa’s Web.

Jun
12
2016
1

Book of the Week: Medusa’s Web.

I could have sworn that I did Tim Powers’ Medusa’s Web last week, or something; but I can’t find it on the Book of the Week list. Anyway, just started it today, and it’s Powers, so I figure it’s safe to put it up now. So far it seems to be about time travel and madness, which is always a plus.

And so, adieu to …Tim Powers’ Last Call.  Must be why I thought that I had done Medusa’s Web already.

Jun
02
2016
2

Book of the Week: Last Call.

Tim Powers is always a reliable person to read, of course: and Last Call is undoubtedly the go-to book if you ever want to read about how Las Vegas, poker, the Tarot, Bugsy Siegel and the Fisher King are related.  …And if you never realized that you wanted to read about all of that, well, today’s your lucky day.

 

And so, adieu to The Awesome.

May
13
2016
2

Book of the Week: The Illustrated Man.

…I miss Ray Bradbury. Then again, who doesn’t? My only qualm about doing The Illustrated Man now is that I’m doing it now: like so many of Bradbury’s work, it’s best appreciated in autumn. Mid-autumn, when the days can still be warm, but the night wind has that delicious chill to it. I’d leave my window open those nights, as much to hear the wind rustle the trees outside as to get that crisp air that rolled in off of the sea.

I miss that air.

And so, adieu to The Crash of Empire (Imperial Stars, Book 3).

May
04
2016
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Book of the Week: The Crash of Empire (Imperial Stars 3).

I got reminded of The Crash of Empire (Imperial Stars, Book 3) via comments in another post: the book (edited by Jerry Pournelle and John Carr) is a collection of short stories and essays about, unsurprisingly, wars and empires. There’s some pretty good stories from the 1950s Campbell era in here, so check it out.

And so, adieu to Hallow Mass.

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