Last week’s Not-Shocking news: HBO Max now on Roku.

Yeah, I missed this because CYBERPUNK 2077. But we all knew this was going to happen. HBO Max needed to be on Roku, and Roku needed to be able to add that channel. They were always gonna make a deal; they just needed to figure out who got what.

I’m of mixed minds, here. On the one hand, I was willing to pay for a year-long subscription if it meant getting The Snyder Cut. On the other hand, this deal will do nothing to help the movie theater industry. And, on the gripping hand: there’s a bunch of DC Universe stuff that I can watch now. So there’s that.

Zac Snyder Alters The Deal, brings back Jared Leto for JUSTICE LEAGUE.

Snyder will likely alter it further: “Jared Leto has joined Zack Snyder’s Justice League Director’s Cut, and he will reprise his role as Joker. Leto is a part of the additional shooting that is being done for the film.” The additional shooting which was never supposed to happen in the first place. Back when this was just going to be a recut of the movie. With only some special effects added. And so on, and so forth, while all the while Snyder keeps turning the screws — and now here we are, and where we are is hilarious.

Continue reading Zac Snyder Alters The Deal, brings back Jared Leto for JUSTICE LEAGUE.

I’m just not seeing how HBO Max works out.

I mean, it’s trying real hard to play catch-up to the Mouse. But that sentence says it all, doesn’t it? Warner Bros. (the folks behind HBO Max) doesn’t have the immediate brand identification that Disney enjoys, and it shows. I’m also not getting why they’re not bundling the DC streaming service directly into HBO Max, either. Disney+ had to combine Star Wars, Marvel, National Geographic, and Disney’s own core materials to get a viable streaming platform; does anybody in Warner think that they’re going to get people to buy two different platforms?

Moe Lane

PS: I think that an answer to this problem might be copyright reform. Twenty-five years after first publication, then done. Somebody will be happy to curate pre-1995 collections of movies, TV shows, and radio broadcasts; and, shorn of the illusory promise of their backlists*, the studios can realistically price what it’s worth to have free access to their current inventory. But what do I know? I’m just this guy on the Internet.

*I don’t really think that non-Mouse studios have an appealing enough backlist to justify a permanent subscription. Heck, arguably Disney doesn’t, either.