Aug
21
2016

Tweet-storm of the Day, Netflix’s Unexpected Success edition.

I think Jimmie’s got the right thought in this Netflix mini-thread of his:

To summarize the thread: Netflix had to go for independent programming because the movie/TV studios assumed that they could aggressively gatekeep their existing content and there’d be no blow-back.  Turns out that that was wrong, and now an increasing number of online streamers are getting a piece of a revenue stream that they’d previously thought was beyond their reach. I’ll add here that it’s getting cheaper and easier all the time to produce a television show with acceptable production values: get decent actors, and you’re all set.  Well, generic ‘you.’

Anyway, the moral of the story? Pay close attention to your price points. Too high a price can actually cause your product to lose a discernible amount of perceived value, and the value of a thing is the price it will bring.

5 Comments

  • JAB says:

    There are a heck of a lot of wanna-be actors out there, looking for their big break. Some of them may be horrible, but with an ok director, a part that isn’t too wacky compared to their real life [no Canadians trying to play someone from rural Georgia, or vice versa], and enough time that you can try a scene, watch it, and try it again, over and over, I tend wonder at least if the actor’s skill at “acting” is the least important part.

    • zamoose says:

      I dunno. The kids (particularly Dustin) in Stranger Things were perfect and I can’t see the show being nearly as good without them.

      • acat says:

        It’s really weird to think about how different, for example, the Terminator franchise would have been if the original concept – the Terminator as a guy of *totally average* build and looks, not a walking tank – had been made.
        .
        Every now and then, the audition tapes (or, even more rare, some scenes) of one actor playing the part that another “made his/her own” bubble up, and we get glimpses of the world we could have had.
        .
        Mew

      • JAB says:

        I dunno either, and haven’t seen the show. But is that because they’re amazing actors, and would do great in any part? Or is that because there was a decent casting director, who could fit basic personalities into a slot?

  • acat says:

    Netflix wanted to *deliver* content, not *make* it, but ..
    .
    Funny thing. Video rental stores – pre-Blockbuster** – didn’t want to *make* content either .. but they ended up distributing plenty of low-budget films that weren’t all that bad.
    .
    Like this one: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0090192/?ref_=filmo_li_tt
    .
    (I’d include a couple others here, but .. I don’t want to make more work for Moe cleaning his spam filter)
    .
    So .. back when Netflix started as a DVD-rental-by-mail business, they used a similar model .. and had most of the same low-budget oddball stuff the mom-n-pop VHS shop across from the pizza place used to have .. only they’d save me having to walk three blocks carrying a pizza.
    .
    Now? It’s the same model, just with another update.
    .
    Mew
    .
    .
    ** If you don’t recognize this store name, kids, go ask your parents.

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