I do like the LOKI show.

Then again, I like the Disney+ MCU shows generally. LOKI in particular is the sort of thing that can only be made when a studio has more money than God and is amusing itself by having Tom Hiddleston sing in Norwegian. Which he does a pretty good job at, mind you.

I know, I know. But the family wants the channel and we’re paying for it, so I might as well enjoy the stuff I like.

Watched the first episode of LOKI today.

It’s good, although some people online were a little surprised by the aesthetic. The aesthetic is VERY 1970s pre-digital bureaucratic, with analog everywhere. Personally, I liked it a lot — but I also associate said aesthetic with things like CONTROL or the SCP Foundation, which means I’m expecting LOKI to dive into cosmic horror pretty quick. Guess we’ll see if I’m right!

Disney giving Loki and Scarlet Witch their own miniseries.

Interesting, no?  “Marvel Studios will give a solo spotlight to both Tom Hiddleston’s Loki and Elizabeth Olsen’s Scarlet Witch, with each getting a TV miniseries to be offered exclusively through the Disney streaming service that is expected to launch in late 2019.”

:steady look: Continue reading Disney giving Loki and Scarlet Witch their own miniseries.




Quote of the Day, I Lean Towards “Loki Is A Spider” Myself edition.

I came across this passage while idly discussing Norse myth with my wife.

Loki’s origins and role in Norse mythology have been much debated by scholars. In 1835, Jacob Grimm was first to produce a major theory about Loki, in which he advanced the notion of Loki as a “god of fire”. In 1889, Sophus Bugge theorized Loki to be variant of Lucifer of Christianity, an element of Bugge’s larger effort to find a basis of Christianity in Norse mythology. After World War II, four scholarly theories dominated. The first of the four theories is that of Folke Ström, who in 1956 concluded that Loki is a hypostasis of the god Odin. In 1959, Jan de Vries theorized that Loki is a typical example of a trickster figure. In 1961, by way of excluding all non-Scandinavian mythological parallels in her analysis, Anna Birgitta Rooth concluded that Loki was originally a spider. Anne Holtsmark, writing in 1962, concluded that no conclusion could be made about Loki.[60]

…I personally feel that Anne Holtsmark was cheating a little, there.